Lets Talk Design – 4 “Must Know” Word Pairs

At Media Bakery, we love trying new things and are always inspired when people find their passions. Diving deep into the world of design can be hard enough without having to learn a whole new language, so we thought we’d help and give you our favorite 4 pairs of words that are absolutely necessary in design.

1. Vector vs. Raster

MediaBakery_SNP0000892In the digital design world, this just might be the most important thing to remember. Vectors are made of lines and points that are infinitely scalable meaning that it doesn’t matter what size you made it, it can be made smaller or larger to an infinite amount and still look incredible.

Rasters, on the other hand, are made of dots or points. When these are scaled they lose the ability to hold true to their form because the pixels aren’t capable of conforming any larger or smaller than they already are.

 

 

 

2. Serif vs. Sans Serif

MediaBakery_TET0069414

Typography has its own list of rules, but the basics begin with Serif and Sans Serif. All serif typefaces have little feet on the letters, sans serif typefaces are with out them (sans is French meaning “without”)

It’s important to understand how each can benefit your design. For example, serif typefaces are easiest to read in print, and sans serif is often used digitally because its easier to read at a lower resolution. The combination of the two can also be used to create great contrast.

 

3. CMYK vs. RGB

MediaBakery_CUP0060262This will help when it comes to what the final destination of your design is. Whether you’re editing pictures, or creating a design from scratch, you’ll need to answer some questions. Are you designing something for print? You’ll need to be in CMYK color mode. It stands for cyan, magenta, yellow and black, and is used in printing by adding bits of those colors on top of each other on white paper until they produce the color in your design.

Alternately, If your design is for the web or digital then you can remain in an RBG color mode which stands for red, blue and green. Combinations of those three colors are what you see, even right now, as you look at anything digital.

 

4. Leading vs. Kearning

MediaBakery_WAV0376196This is my personal favorite and takes us back to the subject of typography. Leading will add or subtract space between two lines vertically, and can be used for text or design fonts to take away some unnecessary negative space between lines. Kearning will add or subtract space between characters horizontally. This isn’t particularly useful when it comes to large bodies of text, but can be extremely helpful when using a design font. If you look carefully, sometimes the fonts have more space than is necessary, or maybe your design calls for more space between each letter and rather than putting another character in there with the space bar you can just use kearning.

 

 

 

 

 

Designing is an art that has found a way to capture audiences and by continuing to learn and develop key tools, it can become a great way for you to share any message!

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